Sky Loom Pavilion


Sky Loom Pavilion

Made from recycled and recyclable Kraft paper tubes with a water resistant coating, the canopy shades the plaza in front of the gallery in a dappled pattern that changes with the sun’s course across the sky. The large circular enclosure’s shape is informed by the kiva, and appears to be carved from the landscape-like mass around it. The shade canopy is corbeled off of the enclosure and a second support, forming a large umbrella composed of small circular apertures. The structure’s Kraft paper tubes are connected along their sides, assembled and erected in sections.

The tubes’ interiors are colored brilliant turquoise, alluding to the long history and shifting value of the commodity’s extraction from the region and identifier of Santa Fe’s folk art reputation in the wider world. The Kraft paper color makes reference to Pueblo adobe architecture and the landscape itself. The contrast can be read as locally and architecturally appropriate while also allowing that there may be dissonance between Santa Fe’s vibrant arts identity and its uniform architectural design guidelines. In that sense this temporary structure is compliant on the outside, and animated - even potentially rebellious - on the inside, speaking both the city’s current status and its history of colonization.

  • DETAILS
  • Competition entry for entrance pavilion at Site Santa Fe 2014 Biennial Exhibition
  • Santa Fe, NM
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  • TEAM
  • Jeffrey Allsbrook, Silvia Kuhle, Greg Corso, Erin Cuevas
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